1. SELECTION OF CARRIER:
If you are using a constructed baby carrier with seams/rings/buckles, etc., make sure that the carrier has been constructed safely and continually inspect it for signs of wear. For example, you might want to think twice before buying a used sling if you don't know who made it and what kind of rings they used. If using or making a wrap, make sure that the fabric is appropriate for a wrap (strong and not slippery).
2. METHOD FOR GETTING CHILD INTO AND OUT OF THE CARRIER:
You should be in control of your child until you have checked (and double-checked) that your child is safe in a carrier. When doing back carries, use a method that is secure for your child, even if your child decides to arch his or her back, let go, wiggle, etc. Make sure that you have chosen a safe place for getting baby in the carrier. If you are uncomfortable in a parking lot, then wait until you arrive at a safer destination to put baby in the carrier. Make sure that you also know a safe way to get baby out of a carrier. If you only know how to get your child off your back using a couch or bed, then don't put your child on your back if a couch or bed is unavailable. Practice getting your child out of a carrier quickly, in case your child needs immediate attention, such as if your child is choking.
3. POSITION OF CHILD IN THE CARRIER:

Your child needs good airflow, proper alignment of head and neck (especially for newborns and young infants), and good blood-flow to extremities. A deep cradle position that might provide good airflow in a thinly-woven rebozo may not be safe in heavy synthetic brocade. Put your carriers up to your nose to test if you can easily breathe through the fabric or not. Use this information when finding good positions for your newborn or young infant. Check that your baby's head and neck are aligned and supported well, and that your baby's chin is not pushed into his or her chest. Make sure that wraps, Mei Tais, and other "tied" carriers, are not cutting off blood flow to legs. For children with low or high muscle tone or other developmental issues, check with your child's doctor or therapist for safest carrying positions.

4. ACTIVITIES YOU ENGAGE IN WHILE BABYWEARING:

Make sure that what you are doing while babywearing keeps your baby safe. Be very careful around stoves, hot liquids, or any potential burn or scald hazard. Be very careful in winter weather that your child is not at risk of frostbite. Be careful while babywearing on slippery surfaces, steep flights of stairs, etc. Never use a babycarrier in place of a car seat.

5. BABYWEARING OBSESSIONS:
Do not buy so many carriers that you are unable to feed your family, pay your utility bills, or pay your mortgage or rent. If compulsive shopping is taking a toll, get help!